Both presentations and workshops raised numerous issues on both general and specific aspects of the theme of the conference: issues relating to, for instance, what global learning is about, should be about, can be about, can’t be about. [Elaine Miskell’s two pager - included in the conference pack - gives a good sense of such issues as will the different workshop reports.]

  • What I’m trying to do here is to give a sense of key themes coming up through presentations and discussions. Obviously it’s not a finished product: more a ‘back of the envelope’ first stab.
     
  • In trying to comprehend what was discussed I thought over lunch that an adaptation of the old DEC [Birmingham] logo might be helpful in this, an interrelationship between three components: Quality, Global Learning, by Learners (after all it is the learners themselves who the conference sees as engaged in their own learning about local-global connections, issues and developments).

Presentations and workshops illustrated each of these aspects:

Global Learning:

  • a focus on the point that the 'global' is here, with you, me, in Birmingham, at Millennium Point, at school, in our communities; it's not 'over there'.
  • a focus on inter-relationships: the inter-dependence of you with other people, and of people and their local-global environment, people and their local-global economies, local-global societies, local-global politics; it’s more than only the international.

… by Learners:

with discussions focusing on the purpose of education, and on the educational methods to be used:

  • a purpose that, in discussions at conference, seems to revolve around: developing young people’s capacity and capability to lead fulfilling lives

and methods discussed that may be summarised perhaps as relating to:

  1. developing a shared understanding of global issues and their relationship with us, and of an appreciation that more than one understanding is often possible;
     
  2. challenging of existing practices starting with our own;
  3. developing and trying out new practices, employing creativity, taking risks and learning from that.

What we share and want to share with others is … Quality:

  • every workshop discussed to greater or lesser extent issues of ‘quality’ in developing and employing global learning in education: in school partnerships, in study visits, in school leadership. Long lists of criteria can be dawn up as a result. … but looking at those lists it seems to me that they can be summarised under a limited range of headings.
  • I offer the following three – not as the final word – but as hooks to help us in talking about, promoting, and perhaps marketing what we discussed and do.

suggested core characteristics of Quality Global Learning by Learners:

  • the global is us and others: it is where we are
  • It relates to perspectives other than our own as well as to our perspectives
  • It develops through personal experiences - experiences of connections, of perspectives, of change: enabling reflection, emotion and action.

How do we share this?

  • successful marketing and promotion suggests that a well defined ‘product’, a uniqueness to that product (either real or imagined), and a simple message are all required ingredients.
  • further thought, discussion and action on those core characteristics of Quality Global Learning may go some way towards a sharing with impact.

Harm-Jan Fricke
Education & Campaigns Management Consultant
Global Learning: dia a focus on the point that the 'global' is here, with you, me, in Birmingham, at Millennium Point, at school, in our communities; it's not 'over there'. dia a focus on inter-relationships: the inter-dependence of you with other people, and of people and their local-global environment, people and their local-global economies, local-global societies, local-global politics; it’s more than only the international. arrow … by Learners: dia with discussions focusing on the purpose of education, and on the educational methods to be used: • a purpose that, in discussions at conference, seems to revolve around: developing young people’s capacity and capability to lead fulfilling lives • and methods discussed that may be summarised perhaps as relating to: 1. developing a shared understanding of global issues and their relationship with us, and of an appreciation that more than one understanding is often possible; 2. challenging of existing practices starting with our own; 3. developing and trying out new practices, employing creativity, taking risks and learning from that. arrow What we share and want to share with others is … Quality: dia every workshop discussed to greater or lesser extent issues of ‘quality’ in developing and employing global learning in education: in school partnerships, in study visits, in school leadership. Long lists of criteria can be dawn up as a result. … but looking at those lists it seems to me that they can be summarised under a limited range of headings. dia I offer the following three – not as the final word – but as hooks to help us in talking about, promoting, and perhaps marketing what we discussed and do. dia suggested core characteristics of Quality Global Learning by Learners: * the global is us and others: it is where we are * it relates to perspectives other than our own as well as to our perspectives * it develops through personal experiences - experiences of connections, of perspectives, of change: enabling reflection, emotion and action. arrow How do we share this? dia successful marketing and promotion suggests that a well defined ‘product’, a uniqueness to that product (either real or imagined), and a simple message are all required ingredients. dia further thought, discussion and action on those core characteristics of Quality Global Learning may go some way towards a sharing with impact. Harm-Jan Fricke Education & Campaigns Management Consultant e-mail hjfricke@btinternet.com